Marilyn by Norman Mailer

First published: 1973 Genre: Biography 1. First lines. 2. Cover: Audible 3. A photo of Marilyn Monroe (while she was still known as Norma Jeane Dougherty) taken by Andre de Dienes, 1945. [No known copyright] tumblr 4. Portrait of young Marilyn Monroe, black and white. [CC0] Wikimedia. .5 Marilyn Monroe photo pose Seven Year Itch. cropped Published by Corpus Christi Caller-Times-photo from Associated Press – Corpus Christi Caller-Times page 20 via en:Newspapers.com, [Public Domain] Wikimedia. 6. Monroe as an infant By Dell Publications, Inc. New York, publisher of Modern Screen (Page 34) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A biography of screen star Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962) by Norman Mailer, an American novelist, journalist, essayist, playwright, activist, film-maker and actor.

“She was a cornucopia. She excited dreams of honey for the horn.”

“Marilyn” by Norman Mailer
  • Glanceabook: “I found it hard to get used to the language that is so eye-rollingly overdone that it feels phoney. However, I began to enjoy the book more as Marilyn became more famous, and the dimensions of her mental illness were explored.”
  • New York Times: “Norman Mailer inflates her career to cosmic proportions. She becomes “a proud, inviolate artist,” and he suggests that “one might literally have to invent the idea of a soul in order to approach her.” He pumps so much wind into his subject that the reader may suspect that he’s trying to make Marilyn Monroe worthy of him, a subject to compare with the Pentagon and the moon.”

Quotes:

“Yet she was more. She was a presence. She was ambiguous. She was the angel of sex, and the angel was in her detachment.””

Author: Norman Mailer

Other editions.
The Marilyn Monroe Story (Rare 1963 Documentary)

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